How to evaluate which toothpaste is best for you

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How to evaluate which toothpaste is best for you

One does not simply select a brand of toothpaste.

The choices on the shelves of your local retail stores contain dozens of choices.  Is the one with baking soda the best option?  Or maybe the one with whitening power?  What about the one with tartar control?  Of course, it’s not of much help that you’re constantly bombarded with advertisements everywhere you turn.  Some of the claims made by toothpaste manufacturers are created by marketing departments rather than certified dentists.

Do not stress!  We’re here to remove some of the confusion and mystery of choosing a good toothpaste.  Here we will consider three things when it comes to choosing the best toothpaste.

Look for the seal of approval

It’s important to be positive that you’re choosing a toothpaste that contains the seal of approval from the American Dental Association (ADA).  This seal signifies that the product meets expectations of containing specific ingredients and having them accurately labeled on the product.

The seal of approval from the ADA also shows that the product has been created under supervised, laboratory-controlled conditions.  This means you know you’re getting a quality toothpaste that contains no additives.

The ADA highlights the following points with regard to toothpaste:

  • In order to receive the ADA Seal of Acceptance, toothpaste must contain fluoride.
  • Toothpastes may also contain active ingredients that serve to decrease tooth sensitivity, whiten teeth, reduce gingivitis or tartar, or prevent bad breath or enamel erosion.
  • Flavoring agents that can lead to tooth decay, such as sugar, cannot be included in any ADA-Accepted toothpaste.
  • In order to earn the ADA Seal of Acceptance must provide scientific evidence that demonstrates its safety and effectiveness, which is determined by the ADA Council on Scientific Affairs in accordance with objective requirements.

Be skeptical of toothpaste that makes promises

how to pick the right toothpasteMany kinds of toothpaste make a whole lot of promises.  Ad slogans can be found everywhere in magazines and on TV.  But do such promises really hold true?  Let’s consider a few of them:

  • Whitening: Yes, whitening toothpastes can work – but not to the extent that professional whitening will.
  • Enamel restoration: It may be possible to strengthen one’s enamel with the right toothpaste, but it depends on how damages your enamel is, to begin with.  If your enamel has begun to break down, it’s a better idea to speak with a professional dentist to get your teeth properly restored.  Professional techniques will prove more effective than any toothpaste to this end.

A matter of choice

Everyone has their own personal favorite flavor of toothpaste.  That’s why we offer many different flavors in our office.  So long as the toothpaste has the ADA seal of approval, the only thing that limits you is personal preference.  Favorite flavors can also act to help motivate children to brush their teeth on a regular basis.

For more information on ADA-approved kinds of toothpaste and to schedule an appointment, contact the office of Dr. Michael McBride today.

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.ada.org/en/member-center/oral-health-topics/toothpastes

https://mcbridedental.com/our-practice/meet-the-doctor/

 

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